Vaccinating Children Seen As A Key Step Toward COVID-19 Herd Immunity

Nurse manager Lucy Golding draws up doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine March 14 in Stamford, Conn. Moderna has begun registering babies and children into a vaccine trial.

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Nurse manager Lucy Golding draws up doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine March 14 in Stamford, Conn. Moderna has started registering infants and kids into a vaccine trial.

John Moore/Getty Images

” The response from the parents has been frustrating,” he states. “Theyre calling literally all day, requesting when they can get their kids immunized.”

Pfizers vaccine presently is authorized for individuals as young as 16, and the business is testing its vaccine on 12- to 15-years-olds. The vaccines from Moderna and Johnson & & Johnson currently are for individuals 18 and up.

Having the young immunized would bring the nation “another step closer to actually attaining herd resistance and safeguarding everybody,” states Dr. Steve Plimpton, an OB-GYN in Arizona who is the principal investigator for the Moderna childrens trial in Phoenix.

In an interview with Morning Edition, Plimpton states parents have actually aspired to sign up their children for the Moderna trials, which will consist of 6,750 children in the U.S. and Canada.

The U.S. has administered more than 110 million dosages of COVID-19 vaccines, however the huge majority of those jabs are going to adults. Moderna announced Tuesday that it has started enrolling children from 6 months to less than 12 years of ages into a trial of its COVID-19 vaccine.

And now were going to have more direct exposure concerns for these kids,” Plimpton says. “But indirectly, theyre also going to be safeguarding themselves and those around the kids that may be contaminated if the kids in fact get infected.”

The study is scheduled to last about 14 months, but Plimpton says he does not anticipate it to take that long. “We currently have 300 moms and dads here in Phoenix that want to get their kids injected. So to attain the 6,750 patients we desire for analytical significance in order to get the data to go to the FDA, itll probably be less than that quantity of time,” he stated.

He adds, “Were going to head more towards a community immunity and then certainly on to herd immunity by taking this population out of the possible transmission of COVID-19.”

So, if young kids can be immunized, will it mean a return to playdates?

“Were all starved for any social interaction for our kids, if not for ourselves. So this is a step getting back to our typical life,” Plimpton says.

Ryan Benk and Elena Moore produced the audio variation of this story. Avie Schneider produced for the Web.

The research study is arranged to last about 14 months, however Plimpton says he doesnt anticipate it to take that long. “We currently have 300 moms and dads here in Phoenix that desire to get their kids injected. To attain the 6,750 clients we desire for statistical significance in order to get the information to go to the FDA, itll probably be less than that quantity of time,” he said.

And now were going to have more direct exposure problems for these kids,” Plimpton states. “But indirectly, theyre likewise going to be safeguarding themselves and those around the kids that may be contaminated if the kids in fact get infected.”