ER Doctor Who Diagnosed First Confirmed NYC COVID-19 Case Reflects 1 Year Later

For Dr. Chen, who was five months into her first post-residency job, the chaos of the pandemic was already mounting in New York by the time the WHO made its declaration5 Chen had diagnosed the citys first verified COVID-19 case 10 days before March 11. Chen says some of her greatest memories from March are tied to the noises of ventilator alarms beeping, as intubated clients combated to make it through. “We acknowledged that she most likely would not endure,” Chen states., and they brought their phone to her favorite childhood beach,” Chen says.

Dr. Angela Chen

” Four months in a one-year-olds life is almost half of the time hes lived,” she states. “We werent able to be around for his first steps, we missed the very first time he talked, and its something that, sadly, well never ever be able to return.”

For Dr. Chen, who was five months into her first post-residency job, the chaos of the pandemic was already mounting in New York by the time the WHO made its declaration. Chen had detected the citys first verified COVID-19 case 10 days before March 11. By then, frontline health employees like Chen were rushing to secure PPE and create devoted COVID wards to try to constrain the spread.

Chen was worried about bringing the infection house to her one-year-old son, so she decided to send him to her moms and dads house in New Jersey. He stuck with his grandparents for four months.

” There was this real worry that if I do not do this correctly, if I dont put on this PPE properly, if theres a break in the dress and the glove, if a small particle of virus arrive at me, who knows what might happen,” she states.

Health care employees were thrust onto the frontlines of a crisis that so far has actually left more than half a million dead in the U.S.

Healthcare employees were thrust onto the frontlines of a crisis that so far has actually left more than half a million dead in the U.S.

Chen states a few of her greatest memories from March are connected to the sounds of ventilator alarms beeping, as intubated clients fought to survive. “The quantity of tragedy and death that we saw– absolutely nothing in my training prepared me for it.” This year, however, shes attempting to hang on to the quiet moments of mankind she witnessed in the hospital.

Dr. Chen gos to with her kid, who stuck with her moms and dads in New Jersey while she worked in the ER in New York.

Dr. Angela Chen, an emergency medicine physician at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, says she is quite great at dealing with the unanticipated. Its part of what drew her to emergency medication, and her deal with emergency situation cases trained her to navigate unpredictable times.

She still reflects to one client who was near death in the ICU. “We recognized that she probably would not survive,” Chen says. She decided to call the patients relatives, but discovered that the lady had been estranged from her household living abroad. With time running out, Chen tracked them down.

Dr. Angela Chen, an emergency situation physician at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, diagnosed the citys first verified COVID-19 case last March.

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Dr. Angela Chen

Dr. Angela Chen

Chen states New Yorks fatal coronavirus wave last spring feels like a haze of fear and psychological fatigue when she attempted to keep staff and clients safe. On March 11th, so much was still unidentified.

“Those moments of humankind are the ones I have the most clarity on, in this stage of my life that Ive nearly attempted to repress,” she says.

Dr. Angela Chen

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, and they brought their phone to her favorite youth beach,” Chen states. “They were able to state farewell to her. And she took her last breaths to the waves crashing onto the sand.”

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Then, there was COVID-19.

Dr. Angela Chen

Dr. Angela Chen, an emergency doctor at The Mount Sinai Healthcare Facility in New York City City, diagnosed the citys first verified COVID-19 case last March.