White House COVID-19 Adviser Andy Slavitt Says There Are No Vaccine ‘Silver Bullets’

Andy Slavitt, senior advisor to the White Home COVID-19 Response Team, speaks throughout a White House instruction on Jan. 27. Slavitt talked with NPR about the vaccine rollout.

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White House through AP

Andy Slavitt, senior advisor to the White House COVID-19 Response Team, speaks throughout a White House instruction on Jan. 27. Slavitt talked with NPR about the vaccine rollout.

White House by means of AP

Andy Slavitt, a White House senior advisor on the COVID-19 reaction, states “people are going to need to most likely continue to be more patient than they desire to be,” as the government works to get more doses out.

Scientists say vaccinations need to be as fast as possible to avoid more contagious coronavirus variations from taking control of.

But need still overtakes supply in cities throughout the nation, while anecdotes abound about troubles of attempting to get appointments.

The U.S. is currently administering about 1.4 million vaccination shots a day. About 9.5% of people in the U.S. have currently gotten one dose.

On All Things Considered, stated the government is working to make getting consultations easier and is thinking about mobile vaccination centers. Here are excerpts of the interview:

Look, if we were creating a system with a tidy sheet of paper, we may have done it in a different way. Thats not where we are.

One of the important things thats taking place, and its a little bit worrying and it ought to be worrying to everyone, is that people who are more tech savvy and more time on their hands, perhaps they have more grandkids or kids, theyre the ones that are securing a great deal of these appointments. And people who possibly do not have as much innovation or perhaps arent as proficient with technology and dont have all of those kinds of resources or time are getting locked out.

Are you pursuing any kind of more unified system where were not all trying to register at the hospital and every drug store and the regional health authority and all over else?

Were hearing reporting saying that in Tennessee, the suggestions is register in each and every single county. Im just considering how time consuming it is and how aggravating it is.

Today, much of the pharmacies have their own websites. … Were looking at various alternatives to make it much easier for somebody who would like to know: hello, if theres a vaccine near me, possibly its not at my closest pharmacy, perhaps its at a drug store thats two pharmacies away, or maybe its at a clinic or a medical facility. How do we help people discover the answer to that? And so were working on that.

Were in a circumstance, and we will be for a little while, of undersupply. … But the bright side is we are increasing production each week. Weve increased production that weve provided to states by over 20%. Were opening 100 neighborhood vaccination centers, including 2 that are open already. We are, as you said, starting to move straight into what were calling a federal retail pharmacy program so that there will be more places for the vaccine to be available. And, you know, I think individuals are going to need to most likely continue to be more patient and they want to be. In the meantime, they must know that 40 million plus shots have actually gone out.

This is the week that some 6,500 drug stores throughout the country are going to get doses of the vaccine, which is excellent. Its got a lot of individuals already wondering how theyre going to gain access to those dosages because getting visits has actually been such a scramble for so numerous people. What is the plan to keep this rollout to pharmacies from making a currently chaotic process more disorderly?

Can the White House do anything about that?

I think people know that theres two makers, Pfizer and Moderna, to increase their supply and increase it every week. Weve been utilizing the Defense Production Act as we talked about last week.

And these are all small steps. None of them are silver bullets. … And then at the end of February, beginning of March, well hope to hear what the FDA needs to state about a 3rd vaccine, which is an extremely appealing vaccine from Johnson and Johnson.

The chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, Raul Ruiz, is sounding the alarm about low vaccination rates in Latino neighborhoods. Hes requiring vaccination websites to be established at, say, meatpacking plants. Is that something that youre considering, vaccination websites at offices?

Its got a lot of individuals already questioning how theyre going to access those dosages due to the fact that getting visits has been such a scramble for so numerous individuals. And, you know, I believe people are going to have to most likely continue to be more patient and they want to be. We shouldnt make individuals who, like this, have to chase after vaccines. The vaccines have to go after people. And when we talk to, you understand, behavioral economic expert individuals who study this stuff, they say exactly what the congressman says: that if you eliminate friction, if you make it much easier for people, youll increase that vaccination rate.

Ill inform you what we are thinking about, which is mobile vaccination centers that can move from place to place. They can go to offices, they can go to churches, they can go to communities. Due to the fact that hes precisely ideal. We shouldnt make people who, like this, need to go after vaccines. The vaccines have to go after individuals. And when we speak to, you understand, behavioral economist individuals who study this stuff, they say exactly what the congressman states: that if you get rid of friction, if you make it much easier for people, youll increase that vaccination rate.

Andrea Hsu and Courtney Dorning produced the audio interview. James Doubek produced for the Web.