European Union Warns AstraZeneca Over Reduction In Vaccine Shipments

European Union Commissioner for Health Stella Kyriakides said that in the future all companies producing COVID-19 vaccines in the EU “will need to provide early notification whenever they wish to export vaccines to third countries.”

John Thys/POOL/AFP through Getty Images

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John Thys/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

European Union Commissioner for Health Stella Kyriakides stated that in the future all business producing COVID-19 vaccines in the EU “will need to supply early alert whenever they desire to export vaccines to third nations.”

John Thys/POOL/AFP through Getty Images

AstraZenecas COVID-19 vaccine is in the final phases of the authorization process with the European Medicines Agency, the company accountable for assessing medicines and vaccines. Authorization for the vaccine is anticipated by the end of the week.

The EU has invested 2.7 billion euros (more than $3.2 billion) on supporting the quick production of COVID-19 vaccines.

” While there is no scheduled delay to the start of deliveries of our vaccine ought to we get approval in Europe, preliminary volumes will be lower than initially prepared for due to reduced yields at a manufacturing site within our European supply chain,” an AstraZeneca representative told NPR on Tuesday.

Discussions with @AstraZeneca today resulted in dissatisfaction with the absence of clarity and inadequate descriptions. EU Member States are unified: vaccine designers have social and contractual obligations they need to promote.– Stella Kyriakides (@SKyriakidesEU) January 25, 2021

AstraZenecas smaller supply is a specifically bitter tablet for Europe, since Pfizer said previously this month that it was likewise facing hold-ups– proving a devastating start for Europes immunization campaign for COVID-19 that started just a month earlier.

” Europe invested billions to help establish the worlds first COVID-19 vaccines,” European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen stated in a video declaration Tuesday. “And now, the companies should deliver. They need to honor their obligations.”

” Europe invested billions to help establish the worlds first COVID-19 vaccines,” European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said in a video statement Tuesday. “And now, the companies must deliver. EU Member States are joined: vaccine designers have contractual and social responsibilities they require to maintain. Kyriakides said that in the future, all business producing COVID-19 vaccines in the EU “will have to supply early alert whenever they desire to export vaccines to 3rd countries” outside the EU. She added that discussions on the vaccine shipment schedule will continue Wednesday.

European Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Stella Kyriakides called the news “not acceptable.” She stated subsequent conversations with the business provided no clear reasons for the decrease to what she called “considerably fewer doses.”

News that AstraZenecas guaranteed COVID-19 vaccine shipments to Europe will be delayed isnt agreeing with authorities, who are pushing the company to honor the agreed-upon delivery schedule.

Last Friday AstraZeneca informed the European Commission, the executive arm of the European Union, that it will ship less doses to the bloc than originally concurred upon.

The company did not specify precisely just how much smaller sized the preliminary shipments would be than formerly expected. It stressed that it will still “be providing tens of millions of dosages in February and March to the European Union, as we continue to increase production volumes.”

Kyriakides stated that in the future, all companies producing COVID-19 vaccines in the EU “will need to offer early alert whenever they wish to export vaccines to third countries” outside the EU. The requirement would exclude humanitarian deliveries. She included that discussions on the vaccine shipment schedule will continue Wednesday.