U.S. Records More Than 4,000 Dead In 1 Day From COVID-19, A Grim New Record

A doctor prepares to administer a vaccine injection at NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital on Friday in Bronxville, N.Y.

Kevin Hagen/AP

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Kevin Hagen/AP

A doctor prepares to administer a vaccine injection at NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital on Friday in Bronxville, N.Y.

Kevin Hagen/AP

The spike in deaths follows a hectic holiday travel duration, which delays reporting. So its too early to identify just how much of that surge was due to the holidays or a back-up in reporting, though epidemiologists have anticipated the vacations might be significant.

In an interview Thursday with NPRs Morning Edition, Dr. Anthony Fauci, who is slated to be President-elect Joe Bidens chief medical adviser, stated he expects January figures to grow worse.

The 7-day rolling average has actually hovered between 2,300 and 2,800 deaths in the previous week, according to Johns Hopkins.

The U.S. has for the first time recorded more than 4,000 deaths in one day from complications of COVID-19.

The variety of validated infections in the U.S. stands at more than 21.6 million, according to Johns Hopkins, more than the next highest nation, India. The figure represents about 6.5% of the U.S. population.

Johns Hopkins Universitys Coronavirus Resource Center reported 4,085 coronavirus-related deaths on Jan. 7, bringing the overall U.S. death toll given that the beginning of the pandemic to 365,882. Both figures continue to far surpass the infection toll in other nations.

“As we enter the next couple of weeks in January, that likely will be a reflection of the holiday season travel and the congregate settings that normally happen socially throughout that duration of time,” Fauci said.