Twin Cities hospitals reporting limited ICU beds amid COVID-19 surge

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The states Nov. 5 COVID-19 report reveals 1,075 ICU beds in usage by patients with and without COVID-19 and a capacity of 1,406 immediately available ICU beds.

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” Were at a red alert for ICU beds,” Michael Osterholm, director of the University of Minnesotas Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, said, according to the Star Tribune. “Its bad.”.

To preserve capacity, healthcare facilities are taking actions such as moving treatments to other websites and releasing recuperating COVID-19 clients quicker with take-home oxygen and observation, according to the Star Tribune.

Kelly Gooch –
Thursday, November 5th, 2020
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A COVID-19 rise is straining extensive care system capacity at hospitals in the Twin Cities metro location of Minnesota, according to the Star Tribune.

On Nov. 4, the state reported ICU beds were 98 percent complete in the Minneapolis– Saint Paul location, according to the newspaper.

Rahul Koranne, MD, president and CEO of the Minnesota Hospital Association, informed the publication “100 percent of the COVID patients that have required ICU and med-surg care have been looked after” however acknowledged the stress health centers are feeling and the need to lower the spread of the infection.

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Like lots of locations of the country, Minnesota hospitals are grappling with capacity issues as COVID-19 cases increase.

But healthcare facilities nationwide have actually kept in mind that staffing open beds is challenging as healthcare employees are sidelined from work due to testing favorable for COVID-19 or exposure to the virus.