5 pediatric heart practices cardiologists should question

Physicians should question the use of five common heart treatments and practices that may be unnecessary for pediatric populations, the American Academy of Pediatrics said in a recent guidance

The AAP Section on Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery, a community of more than 800 pediatric cardiologists, developed the guidance after examining evidence on common heart practices during pediatric visits, according to Medscape.

Below are the academy’s five main recommendations of practices to avoid:

1. Don’t order troponins for children experiencing chest pain if they don’t have a family history of heart disease or any ECG abnormalities. 

2. Don’t order a screening ECG as part of a routine sports entry exam for a child who has no symptoms and no family history of heart disease. 

3. Don’t order an echocardiogram for a child who is experiencing chest pain unless he or she has a concerning history or ECG abnormalities.

4. Don’t order an echocardiogram for a child who experiences fainting if he or she has a concerning history or ECG abnormalities

5. Don’t order a screening ECG for a child who is about to start a medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder if the child is otherwise healthy and has no family history of heart disease. 

To view the full guidance, click here.

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