Becker’s 11th Annual Meeting: 3 Questions with Susan Turney, Chief Executive Officer of Marshfield Clinic Health System

I believe medical facility debt consolidation is likely going to continue into the future as a required way for rural medical facilities and centers to be sustainable. But I likewise believe that if done correctly, larger systems can help keep smaller medical facilities sustainable. We require to be able to provide health care services to patients locally for those things that can be safely done in your area. The more individuals do procedures the better they are at them. Thats why we can do things like making use of a rural center and spoke model where what can be done safely in a local environment is kept regional, and when it ends up being more specialized, we get patients to the main hospital for more customized care. In the aggregate of a large backwoods, you can make this work. I think we can have high quality specialized care in rural locations.

Susan Turney, MD, MS, FACP, FACMPE, works as Chief Executive Officer at Marshfield Clinic Health System.

Question: What, from your perspective, is the most significant obstacle about the future of work for healthcare facilities, and what can they do about it? (i.e. automation, desire for more versatility, clinician lacks, and so on).

Virginia Egizio –
Tuesday, November 3rd, 2020
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So were seeing rural health centers close at a worrying rate, and getting suppliers to work here has ended up being more challenging. About 1 in 5 Americans live in a backwoods, and these people are being woefully underserved in terms of readily available resources. Rural locations struggle with a scarcity of public transport, an absence of broadband web access which limits telehealth chances and basic financial development chances, and in basic, rural Americans are older, sicker and poorer than their metropolitan counterparts. To me, the huge challenge is, how do we produce a model of care that serves rural communities well despite all the systemic obstacles?

According to a Merritt Hawkins study, 93 percent of final-year medical locals state they would choose to practice in neighborhoods of 50,000 people or more, compared to simply 3 percent looking for communities of 25,000 or less. According to the Washington Post, “More than 100 of the nations remote healthcare facilities have gone broke and then closed in the previous decade, turning some of the most impoverished parts of the United States into what professionals now call health-hazard zones.”.

On May 25th, Dr. Turney will provide a discussion on “The Nexus of Innovation and Rural Healthcare” at Beckers Hospital Review 11th Annual Meeting. As part of an ongoing series, Beckers is speaking to health care leaders who plan to speak at the conference, which will happen on May 24-26, 2021 in Chicago.

To find out more about the conference and Dr. Turneys session, click on this link.

Q: What do you see as the most exciting opportunity in healthcare right now?

It should not hold true in this country that people are living in areas so deprived of medical care that they could pass away due to the fact that they suffer an occasion and cant reach the medical facility in time. Improving the infrastructure of rural health care is not simply an opportunity, its a moral vital.

ST: Theres a crisis in rural health care that needs solving, and it wont be solved by a single individual or organization. We need neighborhood groups, industry groups, health care suppliers, payors, and state and city governments to very first recognize the scope of the crisis, and then come together to produce significant change to fix it.

Q: Whats one lesson you found out early in your career that has helped you lead in healthcare?

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He was the a lot of patient, kind and thoughtful man, and he had a practically preternatural ability to be present in the minute, specifically with patients. No matter what was going on around him or in his life, he was able to pause when he was with patients and focus totally on them.

Healthcare has had require disturbance, innovation and change for many years now. Do you feel we are seeing that change? Why or why not? Yes, medical facilities that are driving modification and improvement are receiving high marks in quality and patient-satisfaction. They are investing in innovation to collaborate care and making gain access to much easier for their patients. At the same time, they are informing and preparing their labor force to be responsive to innovative modification. The age of volume-driven fee-for-service medication is slowly paving the way to value-based care. Healthcare facilities should transform to end up being companies that reward value instead of volume and develop shipment techniques that use evidence-based practices, procedures and technologies to obtain optimal outcomes and accomplish higher performances. Lots of medical care providers have heard the call for worth and are joining ACOs and working to fulfill this demand. Sadly hospitals that have not transformed to make sure the greatest quality patient-centered care and the most competitive rates are being bypassed by the medical care physicians, the patients and the payers. “.

Where do you choose motivation and fresh concepts? Beckers, of course! In all seriousness, the conference speakers are the best in the market and the sessions are pertinent to leaders in medical facilities both small and large. And I dont have to look any even more than my inbox daily for the most recent health care news and best practices.

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What do you see as the most amazing opportunity in healthcare today? The most amazing opportunity in health care today is the relocate to value-driven care with the client at the center concentrating on health and prevention instead of dealing with symptoms and signs with volume-driven ill visits and hospitalizations. Accountable care, the merit-based incentive payment system (MIPS) and value-based payment programs are driving service providers from volume to value-based care with incentives to reward both the physician and the client!

Learning under Dr. Magnin showed me that, despite all the other distractions and problems we deal with, our work actually is rather simple. Its about the client right in front of us and finding a way to assist that individual. I carried that philosophy through my profession as a practicing doctor, and I live by it today as a CEO, though on a more macro scale. I do what I do to help people, which brings a kind of clearness to my work as a leader

” Whats one lesson you found out early in your career that has assisted you lead in health care? The most important lesson I discovered early in my profession was that health care is a fast-changing world and the necessary was clear; in order to lead successfully I need to master the art of change leadership. I learned to focus on processes and people to drive effective change. As a Revenue Officer and Chief Transformation Officer driving huge modification to help hospitals change their bottom lines from red to black, I found out to engage the management group early on, in addition to getting key individuals into crucial positions (or removing them, in some cases) then the procedure part of change goes much smoother. Its crucial to break big projects down into small wins to develop momentum and commemorate the small triumphes.

To me, the big obstacle is, how do we create a design of care that serves rural neighborhoods well despite all the systemic difficulties?

Thats why we can do things like making use of a rural center and spoke model where what can be done securely in a local environment is kept local, and when it ends up being more specialized, we get clients to the main healthcare facility for more specialized care. I think we can have high quality specialized care in rural locations.

Sadly hospitals that have not transformed to ensure the highest quality patient-centered care and the most competitive prices are being bypassed by the main care physicians, the clients and the payers. “.

Liable care, the merit-based reward payment system (MIPS) and value-based payment programs are driving providers from volume to value-based care with rewards to reward both the physician and the patient!