Telehealth one year from today: 4 CIO predictions 

Randy Davis, vice president and CIO at CGH Medical Center (Sterling, Ill.): Like so numerous things in our business, telehealth will be driven primarily by reimbursement truths– so follow the cash. Beyond that, apps will develop enabling physicians to use the same system as they do for their paging system today. Ease of use for both patients and physicians will develop to the point that the only thing keeping back the usage of telehealth is compensation. Scheduling systems will progress to make the telehealth see “smoother.” Vendors have some underlying items to address to make this a bit much easier for everybody; they recognize this and will address those drawbacks. Someone will establish a “killer app” permitting drop-in video check outs at the bedside for the care team and patient-allowed relative, and iPads on bed rail installed arms to permit this will end up being typical.

We need to have financial sustainability ensured so that we can continue to establish telehealth programs for the usage cases that make sense and include the most worth to our clients. If the payers make sure that compensations will effectively cover the expenditures included with the development and sustainment of telehealth programs, then the financial investment in development in telehealth will be an easy choice for everyone.

Evan Jackson, vice president and CIO at Middlesex Health (Middletown, Conn.): From a supplier viewpoint, telehealth will be a much more ingrained part of how we care for patients, albeit with greater definition of the following visit types: those done through telemedicine as a choice, those which can be done in either case by client choice, and those requiring personally care. Alternative companies will continue to provide completing services– breaking continuity of care– which wiIl force conventional service providers to accept this move post pandemic. Ultimately, nevertheless, how expansive telemedicine remains in a year will be greatly affected by repayment practices of the insurance providers..

Scott Waters, CIO and CTO at Overlake Hospital Medical Center (Bellevue, Wash.): I believe it is an easy prediction that telehealth usage will continue to increase at a significant rate. We are all seeing a steep drop in the peak use that was occurring during the very first 4 months of the pandemic, however even the lower levels we are seeing right now are 2 to 3 times greater volumes of virtual visits than last year..

Here, four CIOs from medical facilities and health systems across the country share their predictions for what telehealth will appear like at this time next year..

Raymond Lowe, senior vice president and CIO at AltaMed (Los Angeles): Telehealth usage is truly dependent on the outcome of the November elections. One outcome will be a more robust budget for reimbursement for teleservices, so we ought to see a much wider and wider adoption of telehealth. The other result might be a repealing of the existing compensations, which would reduce the quantity of telehealth used..

Editors note: Responses have been gently edited for clearness and length..

Reduce of use for both patients and doctors will evolve to the point that the only thing holding back the usage of telehealth is reimbursement. Evan Jackson, vice president and CIO at Middlesex Health (Middletown, Conn.): From a supplier perspective, telehealth will be a much more ingrained part of how we care for patients, albeit with greater definition of the following see types: those done through telemedicine as a preference, those which can be done either method by patient choice, and those requiring in person care. We require to have monetary sustainability guaranteed so that we can continue to establish telehealth programs for the use cases that make sense and include the most worth to our clients. If the payers ensure that compensations will adequately cover the costs involved with the development and sustainment of telehealth programs, then the investment in development in telehealth will be a simple decision for everyone.

While telehealth use has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic thanks to broadened insurance protection and relaxed restrictions, the future of virtual care in the U.S. health care system will rely on long-term compensation practices and continued tech innovations..

With our new discovered proficiency comes convenience, increased expectations and a shift in viewpoint from clients that will require health systems to have telehealth programs readily available to stay competitive.

Question: What do you anticipate telehealth will appear like one year from today?.

More short articles on telehealth: MedStar Health decreases ED visit lengths by nearly 63% after rolling out telehealthFitbit CEO mean businesss telemedicine plansTelehealth will play larger role even after pandemic recedes, Moodys states.

© Copyright ASC COMMUNICATIONS 2020. Intrigued in LINKING to or REPRINTING this material? View our policies by clicking here.

Jackie Drees –
Thursday, October 29th, 2020
Print|Email.

From a care shipment viewpoint, we should have improved workflow, adoptions and the innovation need to be easier to utilize for both clients and companies. Main care will see video specialized care, broader adoption for behavioral health and routine care/nurse gos to will become more prevalent. Quality results will enhance with improvements in remote client tracking that concentrate on the patient-centric home for those with chronic conditions.

The other course I see possibly taking place is that the payment parity presently in place is removed. This will make it a harder sell for health systems to invest in telehealth development and program advancement. I do think that in spite of the barriers to reimbursement that this would bring, we will still see a healthy volume development when we compare this year to next. All of us have actually been required to become skilled in this technology, as patients, care employees, companies and moms and dads. With our new found proficiency comes comfort, increased expectations and a shift in perspective from clients that will force health systems to have telehealth programs available to stay competitive. Health care has actually been on a consumerism journey for a while now. Evaluating, comparing and grading of providers and health systems has actually remained in location for many years. Cost transparency is coming along. Real virtual healthcare is becoming an expectation and it will probably suffice to sustain the continued development and investment.