Cyberattacks are shutting down hospital IT networks: 8 recent incidents

Sept. 22: Regional West Medical Center in Scottsbluff, Neb., reported a computer network disruption. The 188-bed health center and its 28 physician clinics stayed operational throughout the blackout and continued to accept emergency clients.

When the pandemic hit, some cybercriminal promised to prevent hitting medical facilities. Because of their vulnerabilities throughout the pandemic, others might be targeting healthcare facilities.

Oct. 11: Sonoma (Calif.) Valley Hospital reported a “security event” and took its computer system offline. The hospital is still working and examining the occurrence to bring systems back online. Sonoma Valley did not halt optional or required surgeries throughout the downtime and its emergency services remained open.

Oct. 17: Iron Mountain, Mich.-based Dickinson County Health System found a malware attack on Oct. 17 and shut down its IT system to separate the risk. The health system used paper records throughout the downtime and kept its emergency department and almost all patient services operational.

Sept. 20: Nebraska Medicine reported a security occurrence that affected a few of its IT systems. The health system had a network blackout and reverted to paper records. It was able to resume optional procedures and routine consultations Sept. 30.

Numerous attacks on health care companies in current months have actually brought computer system systems down and disrupted service. Below are 8 healthcare facilities and health systems that have reported IT downtime due to cybersecurity events because July.

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The healthcare facility was able to restore its primary system Aug. 19 and continued to bring back the computer system systems and applications through Oct. 6. During the downtime, the healthcare facility reverted to paper records and postponed some services.

Sept. 27: King of Prussia, Pa.-based Universal Health Services reported a malware occurrence and close down its IT system.The 26-hospital health system was able to totally restore its IT network Oct. 5. During the downtime, the health system utilized paper records.

Oct. 14: Cape Girardeau, Mo.-based SoutheastHEALTHs IT group discovered an uncommon quantity of external internet traffic and shut down its computer network to prevent an attempted network breach. The medical facility was totally back online Oct. 17. Throughout the downtime, SoutheastHEALTH service providers went back to paper records and diverted ambulances from the emergency department, although it still accepted walk-in ED clients.

Sept. 24: Ashtabula (Ohio) County Medical Center reported a computer outage due to a technical disruption. The health center implemented downtime treatments and delayed some visits and elective procedures. Clinicians lost computer system gain access to and were unable to see lab outcomes, prescriptions or health histories during the occurrence. The medical center continues to deal with completely restoring its systems.

The medical facility was able to restore its primary system Aug. 19 and continued to bring back the computer system systems and applications through Oct. 6. Throughout the downtime, the hospital reverted to paper records and postponed some services. The medical facility executed downtime procedures and postponed some visits and elective treatments. Oct. 11: Sonoma (Calif.) Valley Hospital reported a “security incident” and took its computer system offline. The healthcare facility is still working and investigating the event to bring systems back online.

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