Children’s Minnesota considering ‘significant’ layoffs, consolidation of services

” Weve had such a long duration of stability and development, the concept that thats going to look different– we knew that thats going to be news for people.”.

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Kids Minnesota stated it is considering moving some pediatric services from its inpatient health center in St. Paul, Minn., to its Minneapolis school. A few of the services that may be combined into one location consist of pediatric extensive care services, neurology services and diabetes care.

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” Weve had such a long period of stability and growth, the concept that thats going to look different– we understood that thats going to be news for individuals.”.

The childrens healthcare supplier saw a $10 million operating loss during the first half of 2020, due mainly to a revenue dip of $96.8 million associated to the pandemic, according to the report.

Alia Paavola –
Friday, September 25th, 2020
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The particular number of layoffs has yet to be determined, the Minnesota Nurses Association states the combination alone might result in more than 100 tasks lost..

Childrens Minnesota CEO Marc Gorelick, MD, said the consolidation is one technique in a strategy that also includes investing more into virtual care, better procurement of supplies and improved monetary services..

Mentioning installing monetary pressure from the pandemic, demographic shifts and policy changes, Minneapolis-based Childrens Minnesota is eyeing “significant” layoffs and service debt consolidations, according to the Star Tribune..

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Dr. Gorelick told the Star Tribune that the modifications are not only a result of the monetary pressures from COVID-19, but also a requirement to respond to longer-term trends such as declining birthrates and repayment changes as value-based care ends up being more widespread..