Spectrum Health CEO Tina Freese Decker on accomplishments, history and health equity

Tina Freese Deckers almost two decades of management at Grand Rapids, Mich.-based Spectrum Health have actually permitted her to attend to health care difficulties such as access and affordability. Now, as president and CEO, she is likewise helping drive change in health equity..

Ms. Freese Decker joined Spectrum Health in 2002 as an administrative fellow. Since then, she has actually held various leadership roles, including executive vice president and COO. She ended up being president and CEO of the 14-hospital health system in 2018..

Kelly Gooch –
Monday, September 14th, 2020
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Here, she answers Beckers questions for females in healthcare leadership:.

Editors note: Responses have actually been modified gently for length and clearness.

Ms. Freese Decker made her masters degrees in health administration and industrial engineering from the University of Iowa in Iowa City.

Question: Who had the most significant impact on your decision to enter into healthcare?.

Tina Freese Decker: My moms and dads. They encouraged me to pursue my career goals– I simply required to be passionate about it. From a very early age, I had a desire to assist others and make an impact for individuals in the community, and I saw health care as being one of the most crucial careers where you could actually deliver that effect..

Q: What do you take pleasure in most about remaining in the industry?

TFD: Healthcare is a complex market. I take pleasure in taking on the really difficult obstacles and uniting excellent talent to create, innovate and implement required change to change our market.

Q: What is the biggest challenge you deal with as a female leader?

TFD: I like to immerse myself in history, so checking out history books is an excellent way and a big enthusiasm to disconnect. And I love spending time with my family, whether thats walking with our household canine or viewing my kids stand out at their passions..

Q: How do you relax outside of the C-suite?.

TFD: Its important as a female leader to really be genuine and have an understanding of ones audience. While it can be a hard needle to thread, I believe its at the core of what makes us reliable..

Q: How do you remain influenced on difficult days?.

TFD: I stay grounded in our mission to enhance health, inspire hope and conserve lives by making individual check outs to patients and caretakers in our centers. Those check outs remind me my day is not so hard.

Q: What is your day-to-day mantra?

Ms. Freese Decker joined Spectrum Health in 2002 as an administrative fellow. Given that then, she has actually held numerous leadership roles, consisting of executive vice president and COO. Im also incredibly proud of our systems focus on health equity, including a program that significantly improved maternal-infant health. We magnified those efforts this year with internal listening opportunities to help team members recover the discomfort of systemic bigotry. Well likewise the broadened cooperations and efforts, consisting of a dedication to reallocate $100 million over the next 10 years for programs and services to enhance health and access among populations affected by health inequities

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TFD: I have 2: “If you wish to go fast, go alone. If you wish to go far, go together,” and, “Imagine the possibilities.”.

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TFD: I am most happy of my achievements as a leader at Spectrum Health over the last 18 years, starting out as an administrative fellow, in driving considerable and transformational modification to resolve some of our industrys most important difficulties– access and cost. Im also incredibly happy with our systems focus on health equity, consisting of a program that significantly enhanced maternal-infant health. We magnified those efforts this year with internal listening chances to help employee heal the discomfort of systemic racism. Well likewise the expanded efforts and collaborations, consisting of a dedication to reallocate $100 million over the next 10 years for programs and services to enhance health and gain access to amongst populations affected by health injustices

Q: What do you consider your biggest career success?.

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