Thousands of Hawaii hospital employees expected to participate in COVID-19 antibody study

Kelly Gooch –
Wednesday, September 2nd, 2020
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The voluntary 18-month Queens Antibody to SARS-CoV-2 Study is open to the four-hospital systems more than 7,000 employees..

” The information from the QUASAR study will give us some insight into the rate of direct exposure in our staff members over a time period compared to the rest of the neighborhood. In addition, for our caregivers on the front lines, the information will likewise show how well the precaution we have actually required to keep them safe are working,” Todd Seto, MD, principal private investigator of the research study and director of scholastic affairs and research at the Queens Medical Center, said in a news release. “Without data from our healthcare facilities, we cant find out and make improvements. We are a company that continuously enhances itself based on science.”.

The Queens Health Systems in Honolulu has started a COVID-19 antibody study to discover more about employee exposure, the organization announced Sept. 1..

Individuals will share group and health status information via a baseline, six-month, 12-month, and 18-month survey, said hospital officials. Participants also will also be offered a baseline, six-month, and 12-month antibody blood test.

Queens Health Systems said it expects 3,000 to 5,000 workers to get involved in the study

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” The information from the QUASAR study will provide us some insight into the rate of exposure in our workers over a period of time compared to the rest of the community. In addition, for our caretakers on the front lines, the information will likewise show how well the safety determines we have taken to keep them safe are working,” Todd Seto, MD, primary detective of the study and director of scholastic affairs and research study at the Queens Medical Center, stated in a news release. “Without data from our health centers, we cant find out and make improvements.