4 times EHR contracts, go-lives cost hospitals and health systems millions in losses in the past year

Kaleida Health in Buffalo, N.Y., reported a $24 million loss on $1.86 billion in income in financial year 2019, positioning partial blame on its Cerner EHR investment. Kaleida posted a $25 million investment into its Cerner EHR system, which belongs to a $125 million job to broaden the ehr and update over several years.

Nacogdoches (Texas) Memorial Hospital terminated a $20 million agreement with Cerner in July, choosing to rather remain using its existing Cerner EHR instead of transitioning to the suppliers Community Works platform. The health center had actually delayed completing the brand-new Cerner EHR system numerous times, most just recently until this year or later, and accumulated about $20 million in debt from the contract. Nacogdoches settled for a $1.01 million termination charge and paid an extra $2.07 million.

Jackie Drees –
Friday, August 7th, 2020
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West Reading, Pa.-based Tower Health reported higher income in the 9 months ended March 31 however ended the period with an operating loss. In the first three quarters of financial 2020, the health system tape-recorded $27.1 million in one-time expenditures– $7 million related to Epic application costs at recently acquired healthcare facilities, and the rest associated to other one-time transaction expenses.

Here are 4 hospitals and health systems that have actually attributed operating losses and financial obligation on their EHR tasks in the past year.

Burlington-based University of Vermont Health Network reported a $10 million operating loss in the very first quarter of fiscal year 2020, which it associated partly to an Epic EHR setup that cost more than expected. UVM Heath Network CEO John Brumstead said the $151.7 million EHR implementation task cost more than anticipated and took longer for physicians to adapt to than anticipated, which decreased productivity.

Nacogdoches (Texas) Memorial Hospital ended a $20 million agreement with Cerner in July, opting to rather remain using its existing Cerner EHR rather than transitioning to the suppliers Community Works platform. The health center had postponed ending up the brand-new Cerner EHR system numerous times, most just recently up until this year or later, and accumulated about $20 million in debt from the contract. Nacogdoches settled for a $1.01 million termination fee and paid an extra $2.07 million.

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