Atlanta Mayor Defends Legal Face-Off With Georgia’s Governor Over Masks

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottom, seen here in 2018 in New Orleans, has called for compulsory mask wearing.

Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Essence

hide caption

toggle caption

Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Essence

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottom, seen here in 2018 in New Orleans, has actually required necessary mask wearing.

Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Essence

” Well see” if a worked out solution is possible, Bottoms tells NPRs Ari Shapiro. “The most crucial thing is that we continue to keep at the leading edge of every choice that we make the health and security of individuals who call Atlanta house. And what we understand from our health professionals is that using masks goes a very, long method assisting to stop the spread of COVID-19.”

Democratic Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and Republican Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp are dealing with off in a legal fight over mask mandates.

The two sides have been working out to settle the case. A court hearing arranged for Tuesday was canceled to continue talks.

Bottoms provided an executive order on July 8 needing individuals to wear masks in Atlanta. Kemp sued, stating her order breaks his executive order, which highly motivates mask using but does not need it. Kemps orders stated towns and counties might not make their own rules that were either more or less restrictive than his statewide rules.

Bottoms talked with All Things Considered about the legal dispute and the upcoming school year. Here are excerpts:

Well, there are many legal theories on this, among them including the reality that its thought that the governors emergency order exceeded his powers as governor. …

Gov. Kemps position is that mayors can not carry out public health policies that go beyond his executive orders. Why do you believe a mayor should have the ability to override a governor on a concern like this?

It is my belief that a mask required is likewise something that local control should rule on. And part of that, its extremely basic: using a mask.

At the end of the day, the guv belongs to a celebration that often discusses local control and typically elevates the need and desire for regional towns to be able to make their own decisions as it relates to any number of matters, including when we got in the COVID-19 crisis and schools were making choices on whether or not they would close, the governor accepted local control on those choices.

Not to mention many of our children in Atlanta have greater than the national average rates of asthma.

How does that experience as the moms and dad of a school-age kid who had the illness affect your thinking about whether Atlanta students can safely go back to school in person?

Not to point out many of our children in Atlanta have greater than the nationwide average rates of asthma. And so there are a number of issues, including our kids then maybe being asymptomatic and then going house and infecting and affecting their households. That being said, were working very carefully with our new superintendent to make sure that our kids have what they need so that they can be prepared for school this fall.

Let me also ask you about prepare for the brand-new academic year. One of your four kids checked positive for COVID-19 and you and your husband did. How does that experience as the moms and dad of a school-age child who had the disease impact your believing about whether Atlanta trainees can safely return to school in person?

Gus Contreras and Courtney Dorning produced and edited the audio story.

Bottoms issued an executive order on July 8 needing individuals to use masks in Atlanta. Kemp sued, stating her order breaches his executive order, which strongly motivates mask wearing but does not require it. And what we know from our health experts is that using masks goes an extremely, extremely long method in helping to stop the spread of COVID-19.”